Wednesday, May 31, 2017

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Batsquatch is an elusive flying cryptid reportedly sighted near Mount Saint Helens from 1980s.It resembles a flying creature, similar to the Ahool and the Orang Bati of Southeast Asia, and its name is  derived from the words "bat" and "Sasquatch." 


This creature was said to have yellow eyes, a wolf-like muzzle, blue tinted fur, sharp teeth, bird-like feet and leathery bat-like wings that span up to fifty feet. In addition, Batsquatch is said to be 9 feet tall and has the ability to affect car engines. This is possibly a misunderstood sighting of Mothman considering it also affected man-made things, like Mothman can.


It is widely reported that on  May 1980 was the first time the creature was supposed to have been seen as it showed itself in the shadow of the clouds during the Mount Saint Helens eruption. 

On April 1994, Brian Canfield was driving in Washington's Pierce County when his truck suddenly died. Canfield said a large creature landed in front of him. He said it was human-like, 9 ft tall with batlike wings and also sported a coat of blue fur. Ever since then it has not been seen and skeptics dismiss it as a hoax.

A possible second sighting was reported in 2009 near Mt. Shasta in California. Several hikers witnessed a "huge" creature with leathery wings (spanning 50 ft.) fly out of a crevice in the mountain. At first, an eye-witness described the creature as having a head similar to a pterodactyl, however upon reconsideration the witness claimed it was more akin to a bat or a fox. 

On June 2011 Pheonix Tieraz (pseudonym) was in his yard walking his dog. He went to pick up the dog when he saw something in the sky. He said the following:

"I saw something flying the the sky. It had bat wings, blue fur and had a face similar to eyes glowing red. It was about 9 feet tall at the least, after I watched it just flew away. "

On April 14, 2014 at Archbishop Hoban High School in Akron OH, a second period Spanish class spotted a giant black mass zip by the window of the classroom at incredible speed. The class claims it was about 9 feet tall with a 20-30 foot wingspan.
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Friday, May 26, 2017

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Dragon's Breath Chilli Pepper

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Thursday, May 18, 2017

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In both Scottish and Irish folklore, the Fachen (aka Fachan, Fachin or Peg Leg Jack) is a malevolent fairy with an appearance so frightening that it reportedly induced heart attacks in anyone who saw it. It wields a spiked club, and uses it to chase away (and kill, if it can) anything that comes near it. It hates all other life, and will destroy whole farms and orchards in a single day. It is active all year, but you can recognize its lair quite easily, due to there being no trees, animals or grass, just barren ground. It only has one arm and leg, so it compensates for being extremely strong in those limbs.


Descriptions tend to vary and include such physical features as a single eye, a rooster like crest, a mane of black feathers tufted at the top and a very wide mouth. The Fachen also was reported to have a single foot and in some cases is said to have only half a body.One of the strangest physical features of the Fachen was its mangled, arm like appendage which is said to have jutted out of its torso. It was said that with this strong, singular, mangled arm, the Fachen could destroy an entire orchard with a chain in one night.


A story in John Francis Campbell's Popular Tales of the West Highlands features a Fachen by the name of Nesnas Mhiccallain who was defeated in a race by the story's hero, Murachadh Mac Brian, who would later become king of Ireland. In Campbell's book the Fachen was also referred to as Direach Ghlinn Eitich, or the Dwarf of Glen Etive.

The Fachen is Monster in My Pocket #114, and resembles a strange, feathery insectile creature.

In a story written by John Francis Campbell the Fachan is described....

"Ugly was the make of the Fachin; there was one hand out of the ridge of his chest, and one tuft out of the top of his head, it were easier to take a mountain from the root than to bend that tuft."

The tale, written in Popular Tales of the West Highlands, tells of a Fachan by the name of Nesnas Mhiccallain being defeated in a race by the Irish hero Murachadh Mac Brian. Through this deed he subsequently becomes the king of Ireland.

The lore of this solitary faery, the Fachan, says that he is madly jealous of the gift of flight and those who have it. He spends all his time brooding on it, bitter that he does not possess it, bitter at such a oversight by the deities! He hates all living things, not just those who fly, and will not tolerate them in his lands. Thus he is rather a lonely figure though it is doubtful that this bothers him.
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Saturday, May 13, 2017

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4000-Year-Old Funeral Garden Unearthed In Egypt

The Djehuty Project, led by research professor, José Manuel Galán, from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), has discovered a 4,000-year-old funerary garden- the first such garden ever to be found- on the Dra Abu el-Naga hill in Luxor, Egypt. The discovery comes during the 16th year of archaeological excavations which are sponsored this year by Técnicas Reunidas and Indra.
The discoveries made by this project shed light on a key epoch when, for the first time, Thebes (now Luxor) became the capital of the unified kingdom of Upper and Lower Egypt about 4,000 years ago.
Dr. Jose Galán explains, "We knew of the possible existence of these gardens since they appear in illustrations both at the entrances to tombs as well as on tomb walls, where Egyptians would depict how they wanted their funerals to be. The garden itself consisted of a small rectangular area, raised half a meter off the ground and divided into 30 cm2 beds. In addition, next to the garden, two trees were planted. This is the first time that a physical garden has ever been found, and it is therefore the first time that archaeology can confirm what had been deduced from iconography. The discovery and thorough analysis of the garden will provide valuable information about both the botany and the environmental conditions of ancient Thebes, of Luxor 4,000 years ago."

Galán continues, "The plants grown there would have had a symbolic meaning and may have played a role in funerary rituals. Therefore, the garden will also provide information about religious beliefs and practices as well as the culture and society at the time of the Twelfth Dynasty when Thebes became the capital of the unified kingdom of Upper and Lower Egypt for the first time. We know that palm, sycamore and Persea trees were associated with the deceased's power of resurrection. Similarly, plants such as the lettuce had connotations with fertility and therefore a return to life. Now we must wait to see what plants we can identify by analysing the seeds we have collected. It is a spectacular and quite unique find which opens up multiple avenues of research."
"Digging in a necropolis not only allows us to discover details about the world of funerals, religious beliefs and funerary practices, it also helps us discover details about daily life, about society and about the physical environment, both plant and animal. The necropolis thus becomes, as the ancient Egyptians themselves believed, the best way to understand and embrace life," concludes the CSIC researcher.
The garden, or funeral garden, was unearthed in an open courtyard at the entrance of a Middle Kingdom rock-cut tomb very probably from the Twelfth Dynasty, circa 2000 BCE. The garden, measuring 3m x 2m, is raised and is divided into a grid arrangement of 30 cm2 beds distributed in rows of five or seven beds.
According to experts, these small beds may have contained different types of plants and flowers. In addition, at the centre of the raised garden there two beds which are set higher than the others where small trees or shrubs probably grew.

In one corner, the researchers recovered a still upright tamarisk shrub complete with its roots and 30cm-long trunk, beside which was a bowl containing dates and other fruit which may have been given as an offering.
In addition, attached to the facade of the tomb, which the garden is related to for the time being, a small mud-brick chapel (46cm high x 70cm wide x 55cm deep) with three stelae, or stone tombstones, in its interior was also uncovered. These are dated later than the tomb and the garden, coming from the Thirteenth Dynasty, around the year 1800 BCE. One of them belongs to Renef-seneb, and the other to "the soldier ("citizen") Khememi, the son of the lady of the house, Satidenu." On each, reference is made to Montu, a local god from ancient Thebes, and to the funerary gods Ptah, Sokar and Osiris.
"These finds highlight the importance of the area around the Dra Abu el-Naga hill as a sacred centre for a wide range of worship activities during the Middle Kingdom. This helps us understand the high density of tombs in later times as well as the religious symbolism that this area of the necropolis holds," concludes the CSIC researcher.
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